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“Anyone whose goal is ‘something higher’ must expect someday to suffer vertigo. What is vertigo? Fear of falling? No, Vertigo is something other than fear of falling. It is the voice of the emptiness below us which tempts and lures us, it is the desire to fall, against which, terrified, we defend ourselves.”

– Milan Kundera, The Unbearable Lightness of Being 

Note: This is an old post whose content was created for fun, with little to no proof-reading or editing. Please read this post keeping that in mind.

Since my last blog post my ventures have taken me to a few of St. George’s finest crag, a brief stint in Yosemite, and now to Smith Rock- arguably the birthplace of American sport climbing. Everywhere I go, though, I am trying to maintain my motivation to try as hard as I can, whether that means pushing a new grade, a new type of climbing or just breaking out of my comfort zone to meet new people and explore incredible places. (really , though, I just want to be like all of the crushers I’ve met and “whip off the proj.”)  While on the pursuit of this goal, I have neglected my blog a wee bit..

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Why do I always think I’m training when I run? That’s not it at all. I’m simply easing into my natural state. – Steph Davis

Note: This is an old post whose content was created for fun, with little to no proof-reading or editing. Please read this post keeping that in mind.

As I laced up my running shoes that Wednesday morning, I reflected that, after today’s classes, I would have only three more weeks left of my undergraduate career. I glanced at my watch – 6:30 AM – and checked the weather. It was already above 60 degrees and the forecast high was well into the upper 90s. Still,  I often managed to drag myself out of bed early to run while the air was still crisp and the sun was not yet too powerful.

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Note: This is an old post whose content was created for fun, with little to no proof-reading or editing. Please read this post keeping that in mind.



Yes, this blog has been posted about 2 weeks late, but I’ve been super busy climbing and enjoying life in the South of France. Thanks to a few summer thunderstorms that have slowed us down, this post has finally taken priority over going wine-tasting and eating more goat cheese..
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A few days after my surgery. You can see my wheelchair in the background;
I’m so glad to be rid of those space boots. Recovering from the surgery
in the end was the easiest part of the entire experience
Note: This is an old post whose content was created for fun, with little to no proof-reading or editing. Please read this post keeping that in mind.
Yesterday I finished my final exams here in Spain and now I can look forward to two months of traveling and, above all, climbing. It’s hard to believe that almost a year ago I woke up with excruciating foot pain after what had already been the most challenging six months of my life. I took the quarter off and lived from doctor’s visit to doctor’s visit unable to run, drive, walk my dog, climb or even run basic errands. The pain consumed me and I fell into a depression and became a shell of my former self.  I lived from diagnosis to diagnosis, hearing words that terrified me, words like “neuropathy” , “Lupus” and “permanent nerve damage”; words and vague statements that threatened to change my way of life forever. Four months passed without an answer or relief and I was beginning to doubt that I would be well enough to leave the country in January or even to live a normal life at home. Then, in the middle of November, after countless doctor’s visits and tests, I was finally diagnosed with compartment syndrome, a rare ailment that only requires minimal surgery to cure. Read More