Summer scrambling!

People often talk about the work-life balance, but in my life I don’t know which one is work, and which one is living, confused about where I truly belong; I feel alive when I’m in the mountains, yet I never stay.  Back home in the city recharges my soul, yet I inevitably grow restless and leave again to find fulfillment in the mountains.  Continuously I cross the threshold between these two worlds – worlds in symbiosis, incessantly turning over.  Both are part of my identity, yet I can’t exist in one forever, not without the other.  Like the sand that falls through the narrow waist of an hourglass, I am constantly pulled from one realm to the other.  This is my life in perpetual motion, a delicate dance balancing pleasure and pain, serenity and insanity. 

by Niki Yoblanski in her piece “the hourglass”

http://themilestickaway.squarespace.com

11822990_10105347054466918_5057343155789059433_o

Photo by Julie Vargo

The work-life balance has been a difficult thing to strike lately. Like the author so poignantly describes in that quote from her larger piece “The Hourglass” , I am constantly struggling to create an equilibrium between my career goals that I am pursuing here in San Francisco and my personal passion to play in the mountains. One unfortunate consequence of this tricky task is that I have completely neglected this blog. This, in turn, will benefit you, my few readers, because this will be light on text and heavy on imagery!


Here is a quick photo summary of some of my adventures in the mountains

In the end of June I made my first trip of the summer out to Tuolumne meadows. There I climbed Tenaya peak and the North Ridge of Mt. Conness. Here I am along the north ridge, admiring the view. In reality, it was extremely windy and stopping for a photo proved to be difficult because I wanted to keep warm!

In the end of June I made my first trip of the summer out to Tuolumne meadows. There I climbed Tenaya peak and the North Ridge of Mt. Conness. Here I am along the north ridge, admiring the view. In reality, it was extremely windy and stopping for a photo proved to be difficult because I wanted to keep warm!

The day before featured much more mild, even balmy, conditions. Here I am up high on Tenaya peak. Tenaya is a very easy climb (going at 5.5 at the hardest part); its ease combined with its length (around 14 pitches) makes for a very fun and enjoyable romp up perfect granite.

The day before featured much more mild, even balmy, conditions. Here I am up high on Tenaya peak. Tenaya is a very easy climb (going at 5.5 at the hardest part); its ease combined with its length (around 14 pitches) makes for a very fun and enjoyable romp up perfect granite.

nearing the top of Tenaya

nearing the top of Tenaya

the approach to conness is only 4 miles long but damn is it steep! Part of the reason I love alpine climbing in the High Sierra   is the fact that with just a little bit of work you are exposed to some breathtaking scenery. Some sport crags certainly boast their own aesthetic appeal... but the high mountain country is one of my favorite landscapes and it is always a joy to be there, huffing and puffing on my way to a mountain. Even if we bail, it makes the trip worth it.

the approach to conness is only 4 miles long but damn is it steep! Part of the reason I love alpine climbing in the High Sierra is the fact that with just a little bit of work you are exposed to some breathtaking scenery. Some sport crags certainly boast their own aesthetic appeal… but the high mountain country is one of my favorite landscapes and it is always a joy to be there, huffing and puffing on my way to a mountain. Even if we bail, simply existing in these places makes the effort worth it.

Some more stunning alpine scenery..

Some more stunning alpine scenery..

untitled-0474

The true mountain climbers.. Marmot !

The true mountain climbers.. Marmot !

Looking down along the ridge we just climbed!

Looking down along the ridge we just climbed!

Right before hitting the summit I found this little nook that was protected from the 60mph + winds that we were battling along the ridge. Generally I love taking lunch on the summit and reveling in the day's accomplishment, but this time we decided to choose comfort over glory for our lunch spot!

Right before hitting the summit I found this little nook that was protected from the 60mph + winds that we were battling along the ridge. Generally I love taking lunch on the summit and reveling in the day’s accomplishment, but this time we decided to choose comfort over glory for our lunch spot!

My partner descending from Conness... the wrong way. Turns out we got thrown for a loop and ended up going down completely the wrong way. What resulted was us dropping back down to 10,000 ft elevation (From the 12.6k foot summit), scrambling back up to to 12,000 ft (bagging White mountain in the process), spotting highway 120 in the distance, downclimbing the slabs of white mountain and bushwhacking 5 miles to finally hit the road around 7 PM. Luckily, we were able to hitch-hike to our car. Arrived back in SF at 1:30 AM, was at work at 8 AM the next day. Quite the adventure!

My partner descending from Conness… the wrong way. Turns out we got thrown for a loop and ended up missing the proper 2nd class descent. What resulted was us dropping back down to 10,000 ft elevation,(From the 12.6k foot summit), reallizing we had made a mistake, shoveling snow into our camelbacks, scrambling back up to to 12,000 ft (bagging White mountain in the process), spotting highway 120 in the distance, downclimbing the slabs of white mountain and bushwhacking 5 miles to finally hit the road around 7 PM. Luckily, we were able to hitch-hike to our car. Arrived back in SF at 1:30 AM, was at work at 8 AM the next day. Quite the adventure!

Plants in Bear Valley, Pt Reyes and later near Azalea hill trailhead in the marin municipal water dirstrict near Fairfax, CA

see that distant peak in the sun? Yeah we downclimbed that and bushwhacked through tons of scrub to get to this meadow, about 2 miles outside of highway 120

The following weekend a friend of mine asked if I wanted to try for the North Arete of the Matterhorn, the leftmost peak in this photo.

The following weekend a friend of mine asked if I wanted to try for the North Arete of the Matterhorn, the prominent leftmost peak in this photo.

Matterhorn peak

Matterhorn peak

Unfortunately, some weather made us decide not to try to go for the Matterhorn and we ended up here that night - on some BLM land right in front of a lesser known eastern sierra crag called

Unfortunately, some weather made us decide not to try to go for the Matterhorn and we ended up here that night – on some BLM land right in front of a lesser known eastern sierra crag called “Granite Dome.” Hey, I couldn’t complain. We had done a 10 mile hike through some spectacularly stunning alpine and subalpine forests and riparian corridors, and that night I fell asleep with a good book in my hand, dozing off to the patter of rain and the sound of distant thunder.

Along the approach to the Matterhorn

Along the approach to the Matterhorn

Resting at the small lake you encounter before the last, grueling mile up some talus during the approach to Matterhorn. The spire in the background is Horsetail spire. Photo by Benjamin Poirier.

Resting at the small lake you encounter before the last, grueling mile up some talus during the approach to Matterhorn. The spire in the background is Horsetail spire. Photo by Benjamin Poirier.

Lilium parvum (alpine lily) as seen along Horse Tail falls during the approach to Matterhorn.

Lilium parvum (alpine lily) as seen along Horse Tail falls during the approach to Matterhorn.

Granite basin, yet another high quality eastern sierra crag that was practically empty on July 4th. We climbed the classic

Granite basin, yet another high quality eastern sierra crag that was practically empty on July 4th. We climbed the classic “Hairraiser buttress” a 3 pitch 5.9 run-out (and very high quality) face climb along granite patina. I did this route last year during memorial day weekend, and it was a pleasure to once again pull on those tiny edges!

Mimulus nanus var. mephiticus growing with a lupine alongside highway 120E.

Mimulus nanus var. mephiticus growing with a lupine alongside highway 120E.

Hulsea algida (alpine gold) growing near 11,000 ft along the talus below the Matterhorn. It was the only plant up there!

Hulsea algida (alpine gold) growing near 11,000 ft along the talus below the Matterhorn. It was the only plant up there!

Eriogonum ovalifolium

Eriogonum ovalifolium

Epilobium obcordatum (rock fringe)

Epilobium obcordatum (rock fringe)

Despite the long drive and pretty grueling approach, turning back on a peak always just adds fuel to the fire and by the next weekend we were back in the Sierra with the objective of doing the North Arete in a day. Along the way we stopped for some sport climbing at a crag known as

Despite the long drive and pretty grueling approach, turning back on a peak always just adds fuel to the fire and by the next weekend we were back in the Sierra with the objective of doing the North Arete in a day. Along the way we stopped for some sport climbing at a crag known as “Columns of the Giants” along the Sonora pass. The climbing here is very physical (the entry grade is 11c) and overhung.

Although I do not excel at the type of climbing at the Columns, I surprised myself. During a second trip there, I was able to onsight two 12b's. It was rewarding to know that all of the plastic pulling and disciplined training I was doing back home in the city was paying off on real rock.

Although I do not excel at the type of climbing at the Columns, I surprised myself. During a second trip there, I was able to onsight two 12b’s. It was rewarding to know that all of the plastic pulling and disciplined training I was doing back home in the city was paying off on real rock.

This time, we went right up to the base of the North Arete. Sadly, the weather looked terrible. The entire route was literally shrouded in a threatening, lurching, gray cloud and it looked like it was about to pour any second. We watched another party turn around along the approach and also saw a guide take his client up the 3rd class coulier instead of climbing the actual route.

This time, we went right up to the base of the North Arete. Sadly, the weather looked terrible. The entire route was literally shrouded in a threatening, lurching, gray cloud and it looked like it was about to pour any second. We watched another party turn around along the approach and also saw a guide take his client up the 3rd class coulier instead of climbing the actual route.

Dejectedly, we turned around to reverse the approach for a second time in a week. Painfully, as soon as we got to the point of no return (where, if we tried to do the route we would likely be either climbing or descending in the dark), the clouds magically evaporated and lended to blue skies. WHile this was extremely frustrating for both of us, I still believe we made the right call (hey, even the guide bailed on the real route!) since neither of us had the skills nor expertise to be able to rig up a quick escape in a storm.

Dejectedly, we turned around to reverse the approach for a second time in a week. Painfully, as soon as we got to the point of no return (where, if we tried to do the route we would likely be either climbing or descending in the dark), the clouds magically evaporated and lended to blue skies. WHile this was extremely frustrating for both of us, I still believe we made the right call (hey, even the guide bailed on the real route!) since neither of us had the skills nor expertise to be able to rig up a quick escape in a storm.

Two weeks later, I was back. I took some time off of work to combine a botany trip with some climbing and spent a solid 5 days in the mountains. The trip started with a solo of parts of the cathedral range. I started with Cathedral Peak, then went to the summit of Echo Peak #3 , then to Echo Ridge. I was originally going to also do Cockscomb and Unicorn peak- to do all major peaks in the range- but the 330 AM wake up time, drive from SF, and 0 -11,000 ft. elevation change in less than 8 hours got to me and I decided to descend from Echo Ridge.  This photo was taken from the summit of Cathedral, Right to left, you can see Echo peaks, Echo Ridge, cockscomb and unicorn peak.), with Budd lake nestled away.

Two weeks later, I was back. I took some time off of work to combine a botany trip with some climbing and spent a solid 5 days in the mountains. The trip started with a solo of parts of the cathedral range. I started with Cathedral Peak, then went to the summit of Echo Peak #3 , then to Echo Ridge. 
This photo was taken from the summit of Cathedral, Right to left, you can see Echo peaks, Echo Ridge, cockscomb and unicorn peak.), with Budd lake nestled within the valley.

Enjoying some delicious homemade Bosnian food on the summit. (Thanks mom)

Enjoying some delicious homemade Bosnian food on the summit. (Thanks mom)

Cathedral peak from the approach to Echo peak.

Cathedral peak from the approach to Echo peak.

View of Cathedral Peak from the summit of Echo Ridge. By the time I got to Echo Ridge, the 330 AM wake up in SF, 5 hour drive, and 0- 11k ft elevation change in less than 8 hours resulted in a raging headache and some profound fatigue. I had originally planned to also link Cockscomb and Unicorn peak to complete the major peaks of the range, but decided to descend and save some energy for the next day's climbing!

View of Cathedral Peak from the summit of Echo Ridge. By the time I got to Echo Ridge, the 330 AM wake up in SF, 5 hour drive, and 0- 11k ft elevation change in less than 8 hours resulted in a raging headache and some profound fatigue. I had originally planned to also link Cockscomb and Unicorn peak to complete the major peaks of the range, but decided to descend and save some energy for the next day’s climbing!

Veratrum californicum (Corn Lily) blooming with Unicorn peak in the background.

Veratrum californicum (Corn Lily) blooming with Unicorn peak in the background.

My partner getting ready to start up the Regular Route of Fairview Dome (5.9)

On the second day, I roped up for the Regular route of Fairview dome (5.9) Here my partner stands at the base. Luckily, we were the first ones on this popular trade route.

View from the third pitch

View from the third pitch

Summit!

Summit!

Resting atop Fairview dome before descending. Luckily it didn't rain, because going down that slab in a storm would have been pretty heinous

Resting atop Fairview dome before descending. Luckily it didn’t rain, because going down that slab in a storm would have been pretty heinous!

yo dawg check out my ride

… back to the bivy spot for dinner! Check out my ride/temporary housing situation.

Not a bad view for dinner :)

Not a bad view for dinner 🙂

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Storm warnings for the following day made me decide to try to summit Mt dana via the hiking route (class 1 or 2), before meeting up with my botany class.  Here is some corn lily (Veratrum californicum) along the trail.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Dana meadows

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

got to the summit just as the storm reached me. Snapped this quick photo and then peaced!

got to the summit just as the storm reached me. Snapped this quick photo and then peaced!

the storm approaches..

about to get wet…

Julie Vargo on the approach to Mt. Humphreys.

The biggest adventure of all was the East Ridge of Mt. Humphreys. The alarm went off at 330 AM in Bishop, got to the trailhead at 5:20, summit by 1:30 and back to the car a little bit before 8 PM. Some route-finding difficulty and the sheer length of hte route caused this to be a 14 hour day. It was hard to stay mentally focused for that long but the location was superb as was the company, so I was never unmotivated for too long. Here is my partner starting the steep approach to Humphrey’s at dawn through a sagebrush meadow.

simultaneously happy and sad to see that we made it back to the jeep. Happy to rest and reflect after a long, beautiful and difficult day in the mountains, but sad as nagging

“moon-set” along the approach to Mt. Humphrey’s

11838943_10105347046467948_4712399466998201078_o

about to gain the ridge

untitled-1198

This was a very special find for me. At around 13,000 ft I was definitely feeling the elevation, breathing really hard as I essentially slogged/hauled my body up the ridge. Then, I heard Julie say “Jasna, you gotta check out this plant”. So, with a little more willpower I upped my pace and pulled myself over a ledge to be greeted by the most beautiful specimen of Polemonium eximium (sky pilot) , a rare phlox that grows only above 10,000 ft in certain locations in the Sierra Nevada!

Photo by Julie Vargo. Sky Pilot grows in such extreme conditions that it only blooms for one month out of the entire year (typically July-August), and during that month its flowers are only open for about 2 weeks. Thus, to find such a robust specimen with all of its flowers open is really special. Its odor is very, very strong and not entirely appealing (smells a bit like urine). It needs to be so pungent in order to attract pollinators, since it only has 2 weeks to get its thang on!

Photo by Julie Vargo.
Sky Pilot grows in such extreme conditions that it only blooms for one month out of the entire year (typically July-August), and during that month its flowers are only open for about 2 weeks. Thus, to find such a robust specimen with all of its flowers open is really special. Its odor is very, very strong and not entirely appealing (smells a bit like urine). It needs to be so pungent in order to attract pollinators, since it only has 2 weeks to get its thang on!

11807763_10105347052650558_2817970935177053529_o

While the East Arete is mostly 4th class, it does include some easy 5th class moves on some interesting features!

11822990_10105347054466918_5057343155789059433_o

Getting my rap’ on

11850442_10105347047740398_6345108646461985472_o

Traversing the ridge toward the second rappel was quite a bit of fun.

11779933_10105347049157558_5031224552744112823_o

You can see hail accumulated from the previous night’s storms on the distant features.





Summit shot!

Summit shot! 13,986 ft! For a moment I thought about sitting atop of Julie’s shoulders and reaching my arms up really high to get to 14,000 ft, but I reconsidered.

After hiking 3 miles with a 3,000 ft elevation gain and traversing the entire east ridge, the most tedious part of the route was yet to climb- the descent! After some 4th class downclimbing, 2 rappels and some scree-skiing we had the pleasure of boulder hopping here.. forever..

After hiking 3 miles with a 3,000 ft elevation gain and traversing the entire east ridge, the most tedious part of the route was yet to climb- the descent! After some 4th class downclimbing, 2 rappels and some scree-skiing we had the pleasure of boulder hopping here.. forever..Photo by Julie Vargo

 Nearing the end of our 14 hr day and we were content as could be while walking through a stunning meadow filled with wildflowers.

Nearing the end of our 14 hr day and we were content as could be while walking through a stunning meadow filled with wildflowers. Photo by Julie Vargo.

At the very end of our journey I was simultaneously relieved and a bit sad to see that we made it back to the car. Happy to rest and reflect after a long day, but sad as nagging errands that had been silenced by the mountains crept back into my head... oh

At the very end of our journey I was simultaneously relieved and a bit sad to see that we made it back to the car. Happy to rest and reflect after a long day, but sad as nagging errands that had been silenced by the mountains crept back into my head… oh “real life”, you are overrated.

On the drive out we were treated to this stunning view of a far-off thunderstorm. It made up for the fact that we got in so late that the Burger Barn (which we were dreaming about on the way down) was closed.

On the drive out we were treated to this stunning view of a far-off thunderstorm. It made up for the fact that we got in so late that the Burger Barn (which we were dreaming about on the way down) was closed. Photo by Julie Vargo

Now, time for some botany! If you hate photos of beautiful flowers, you should skip this section.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015. Chamerion angustifolium (fireweed)- stigma is in a perfect cross!

Chamerion angustifolium (fireweed)- stigma is in a perfect cross! Like most members in the family Onagraceae, fireweed has four petals and an inferior ovary.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015. Cryptanthus spp., a member of the Borage family

Cryptanthus spp., a member of the Boraginaceae family, which features a “Scorpiod” cyme (the flower head curls up into itself like a scorpion’s tail)

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015. Dasiphora fruticosa   (shrub cinquefoil)

Dasiphora fruticosa (shrub cinquefoil) – formerly Potentilla fruticosa- a member of the Roseaceae family.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015. Eriogonum Rosence (Rosy buckwheat)

Eriogonum rosence (Rosy buckwheat), a member of the Polygonaceae family

Linanthus pungens (Prickly phlox)

Linanthus pungens (Prickly phlox), member of the Polemoniaceae family

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015. (Pyrrocoma apargioides (Alpine pyrrocoma)

Pyrrocoma apargioides (Alpine pyrrocoma), which has a single flower on each stalk. It is a member of the Asteraceae family, the largest dicot family, part of the Asterae tribe.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015. Sphaeromeria

Sphaeromeria spp. in bud. Another aster.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015. Dasiphora fruticosa   (shrub cinquefoil)

More Dasiphora fruticosa (shrub cinquefoil)

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

At high elevations the only pine left is the white-bark pine. Once you get high enough this “tree” becomes a shrub due to the extreme conditions which limit its growth. You can see some examples in the lower left-hand corner of the photo

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015. Aquilegia pubescens (alpine columbine) pink hybrid as a result of bes pollianating both white forms usually pollinated by butterflies) and red forms (hawkmoth pollinated)

Aquilegia pubescens (alpine columbine) pink hybrid as a result of bes pollianating both white forms usually pollinated by butterflies) and red forms (hawkmoth pollinated)

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Eriogonum spp. A member of the buckwheat, Polygonaceae, family.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015. (erigeron compositus)

Erigeron compositus, a daisy.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Dramatic views at McGee Creek.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Astragalus whitneyi, balloon-pod milk vetch, a member of the pea or Fabeaceae family, which are distinguished partly by their floral design.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

A lone mountain mahogany along the slopes overlooking McGee creek.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Aconitum columbianum – monkshood- a member of the buttercup or Ranunculaceae  family. The “hood” is composed of the upper sepals, the petals are actually hidden inside this hood.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Quaking aspen along McGee creek. Imagine this in the fall!

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Monardella spp. A member of the Lamiaceae , or mint family.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Calochortus leichtlinii hiding among Artemisia douglasiana to avoid being browsed upon by deer! This is the only mariposa lily that grows in the high sierra

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Hail storm at Rock Creek

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Another image of prickly phlox, Leptodactylon californicum

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Flowering Sphenosciadium capitellatum (Ranger’s buttons) , a member of the carrot or Apiaceae family.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Waxy currant, (Ribes cereum)

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

A member of the Orchidaceae family

A little bit of Mt. Dana on July 31, 2015, botanizing at Ellery Lake July 31, 2015, and botanizing in McGee Creek/Rock lake on Saturday August 1, 2015.

Another image of the hail storm at Rock Creek

Luckily, the fact that when I return from a trip I don’t find myself trapped in an office but rather am sent out hiking and performing restoration field work in places like the Marin Headlands makes the work-life balance all that much easier to strike 🙂 I can’t imagine escaping to the mountains so often while doing anything else. I am very grateful to have my job.

One of my favorite weeks at work involved sweeping the Marin Headlands for non-native tree saplings with a really fun crew

One of my favorite weeks at work involved sweeping the Marin Headlands for non-native tree saplings with a really fun crew

untitled-1290

California Fuschia

California Fuschia

Rain Orchid

Rain Orchid

So, then.. what’s next for me? Well, I’ve had to stay in the city this weekend and likely the one that follows as well.. but there are trips and dreams on the horizon..

Photo by Steph Abegg, as seen on her blog , http://www.stephabegg.com

1 comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: